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Robot Wednesdays

All things Art & Design

superhattiehattie:

Just returned from a trip to Japan where myself and my partner in crime came across these beautiful woodblock printed commemorative stamp envelopes in a little antique shop in Nikko. 1/2

superhattiehattie:

Just returned from a trip to Japan where myself and my partner in crime came across these beautiful woodblock printed commemorative stamp envelopes in a little antique shop in Nikko. 1/2

(via yayasleeps)

1 week ago

superhattiehattie:

Just returned from a trip to Japan where myself and my partner in crime came across these beautiful woodblock printed commemorative stamp envelopes in a little antique shop in Nikko. 2/2

superhattiehattie:

Just returned from a trip to Japan where myself and my partner in crime came across these beautiful woodblock printed commemorative stamp envelopes in a little antique shop in Nikko. 2/2

(via yayasleeps)

1 week ago

dynamicafrica:

In honor of International Literacy Day, I compiled a list of some of my favourite books written by African authors (with the exception of the book about Fela). There are many books I could’ve added to this post but these were the first that came to mind.

There’s no order to this list and each comes highly recommended as they, in some way, changed me for the better. If I had to pick a favourite it would undoubtedly be Zimbabwean writer Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions simply because it was the first book I read in which I related so deeply to several of the characters - and still do. From Nyasha’s struggle with depression and being caught between two cultures she feels alienated by, to Tambu’s hunger for a world beyond her circumstances. Ugandan author Okot p’Bitek’s Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol comes in a close second, it’s just about as cheeky and blunt as I am in some parts and, perhaps a little out of narcissism, is why I enjoyed it.

Between these 18 books you’ll find everything from the personal to the political, and everything in-between. There’s love, there’s romance, there’s struggle, there’s strife, there’s beauty and there’s ugly too. No story is as simple as their titles may suggest, just read Camara Laye’s L’enfant Noir (The African Child) that explores the author’s early childhood in Guinea under French colonisation, or South African writer Sol Plaatjie’s historical novel Mhudi written in 1919 that placed a woman at the center of a story that deals with survival, displacement and early European colonisation in South Africa.

For anyone interested in reading these books, I found some of them available online (not all are complete):

Artist Submission: Hilary White


This weeks feature with Florida-native Hilary White brings a totally new dimension to Robot Wednesday’s Artist Submission series. 

Working primarily with wood and plexiglass, White has developed her love for the medium and created some truly original and jaw-dropping pieces that border on the psychedelic. Incorporating it into her practice of creating three dimensional painted sculptures and installations, White has managed to hone in on her own unique niche within the creative realm. 

Her latest show, "Seer", is a perfect representation of this. In her own words, “the work is a combination of influence from faith, science and completely imagined realities attempting to draw a connection between the three as a catalyst for discussions about what we believe or don’t believe, why, and how this effects how we engage or see the world and each other.” 



When did you first get into painting & sculpture?

I had been drawing all my life, yes I know that’s the proverbial artist answer but its true. My Mom once told me I was drawing before I could walk or talk so it was like a first form of communication for me.

I didn’t get really into painting until I was 18 as a freshman in college, I then cut a painting I had done to make this stained glass looking light box on a scroll saw for a project in class. I fell in love with the tool and then got a scroll saw at 19 and have been combining building and painting ever since.  


How you would you describe your style or aesthetic?

I don’t know, I struggle with this one. It’s somewhere between optical art, psychedelia and theological symbolism, the style is kind of a relief sculpture. I look at them as gateways, or spectacles into the entry point of belief, creating moments of what I hope results in wonder. 


What or who are some of your major influences?

Theology, Science, Record Covers

My work has been about faith and in particular my faith as a Christian and the wonder and dialog that results from daily wrestling and the study of what belief is in that context, what this means for the broader sphere of culture, community and discovery.


I’m also very influenced by theoretical physics that create a hypothesis for the inner workings of the universe. The new realities and dimensions that are described in some of these theories fascinates me. And so both of these subjects are just continually humbling me and creating this dialog of awe.

Right at the center of this dialog is this person called the “Son of God” Jesus. He’s from a dimension higher than the one of earth, one that claims an eternal plane of existence and he enters into this dimension on earth of space, time, matter, gravity, entropy, and lives to unify people to God, who dwells in this other place that exists right along side ours.

This gateway to God in a higher dimension through Jesus through complete selfless love. I can’t get away from that. It drives what I do. It drives me to constant wonder and at times bewilderment. I can’t completely comprehend it. It’s this constant questioning that influences how I make.

Record covers are just pure visceral enjoyment. Some of my favorites that immediately come to mind  are Martin Sharp, He worked on a couple of the Cream record covers, Pushead (Brian Schroeder) who did a lot with Metallica and the Misfits, and of course early Peter Max.

If you could work or collaborate with any artist, who would it be? 

Buckminster Fuller. A great thinker and inventor. He was notably known for his architecture, but his thoughts on the process of creating and sustainability are inspiring.     


My favourite book is… The Bible is something I continually study and a favorite, hmmm I don’t know if it counts as a book but I’m reading articles compiled on the quantum loop theory and string theory by various authors for research. I’ll throw Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon in there too, I don’t know if I’d call it a favorite but the style of his writing and the stories content fascinate me.

Right now I’m listening to… Right now literally right this second I am listening to Irish Folk Music on the radio. If I was listening to something else it might be Com Truise, Sam Cooke, The Stooges,  traditional Zulu songs, all this appeals to me at this moment.  

If I could live anywhere in the world it would be… I don’t have preference. There are lots of beautiful places. Just anywhere my family is. 

At the end of a long day, I like to unwind by… Usually I like to read before going to bed, but sometimes my husband and I will watch an episode or two of Cheers. I think it’s something I picked up from my Dad. He really liked Cheers when I was growing up. 

Hilary White  |  Instagram  |  Facebook